Evacuees from more than 40 homes in Los Angeles County were told the last of their belongings might still be saved

Some evacuation orders lifted in San Bernardino County towns hit by debris flows of last year’s fires

In the hours before the new California deadliest-ever wildfire raced along the state’s hillsides, evacuees from more than 40 homes in San Bernardino County were told the last of their belongings might still be saved.

Instead, they were told about an evacuation order to leave their homes, but not to worry. A few days later the homes would be destroyed by the fire.

“I was scared, but I thought it was my duty to save my property and I was trying to save my family. I was in shock,” said a woman identified only as Jessica in a recording shared with the Washington Post by an anonymous source. The woman, who is pregnant and had to wait to evacuate because of a baby illness, told the Post she hoped everyone would be safe.

By Friday, after residents had received many evacuation notices, their belongings were mostly gone.

In the hours before the new California deadliest-ever wildfire raced along the state’s hillsides, evacuees from more than 40 homes in Los Angeles County were told the last of their belongings might still be saved. When word of the last evacuation order went out, evacuees were told about an evacuation order to leave their homes, but not to worry.

“I was scared, but I thought it was my duty to save my property and I was trying to save my family. I was in shock,” said a woman identified only as Jessica in a recording shared with the Washington Post by an anonymous source.

The woman, who is pregnant and had to wait to evacuate because of a baby illness, told the Post she hoped everyone would be safe.

“I’m very thankful that everything was so well arranged,” she said in a recording she shared on Friday. “I’m very thankful that my husband didn’t lose his life. We’ve been very blessed because he is still in a coma. I’m very thankful to God. I just need to come home.”

Firefighters’ evacuation orders for areas of Los Angeles County, San Bernardino County and Riverside County in California were lifted Friday morning.

“We’re doing what we think is necessary for the safety of the people that are in the house and their families,” Los Angeles County Fire Chief Ralph M. Terrazas said. “The firefighters and the police officers have had everything ready, and things were working perfectly with the (fire) engines

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