Haiti — The Land of the Dead

Haiti Fast Facts

Haiti Information

It is home to over 3.3 million Haitians and was declared a free and sovereign country in 1804, five years after the Haitian Revolution.

It is the country that has the longest colonial history, having been under Spanish and French rule over two centuries (1625-1804).

The country gained its independence from France under the terms of the Treaty of L’Arplaque in 1804, after the unsuccessful French revolution.

The country has endured a variety of social, economic, and political challenges throughout its history. It is now under the management of the United Nations (U.N.).

In 2015, Haiti experienced a devastating earthquake. The following year, the death toll was estimated to be more than 400.

In 2019, the U.N. estimates that more than 10,000 people died as a consequence of the hurricane.

Haiti is located at the intersection of the Caribbean, the African and the South American divisions. It has a long history of contact with the larger world. One of it’s most notable contacts occurred in the year 2000, when Haiti was the location of the first known human landing on the island.

In 1493, the first recorded slave rebellion in the Americas and the first such rebellion recorded to take place in the Western hemisphere resulted in the death of approximately 150 people.

In 1791, Haiti gained its independence from France under the terms of the Treaty of L’Arplaque.

Haiti is the country with the longest colonial history, having been under Spanish and French rule over two centuries (1625 to 1804.

By 1791, Haiti became a sovereign constitutional republic, and a little over a year later, gained its independence from France in the Treaty of L’Arplaque.

In 1791, Haiti gained its independence from France under the Treaty of L’Arplaque.

The largest earthquake that occurred in the Western hemisphere occurred in 2010, which left over 200,000 deaths.

Haiti’s national flag is comprised of two equal horizontal bands

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