The Salton Sea is a Natural Disaster

As Salton Sea faces ecological collapse, a plan to save it with ocean water is rejected by the U.N.’s top scientific body.

“We now have a plan to save the Salton Sea, but they won’t accept it.” That’s how Michael Wara, the head of the Salton Sea Restoration Project, began to explain what he and his team had accomplished to raise money to buy the Sea a few months ago. But that explanation was cut short when the project’s lead scientist, Eric Korsmeyer, a senior research scientist at the University of California, Santa Barbara, started to explain the science behind the project. In his words, the Salton Sea is “not a scientific disaster,” but an ecological one.

“I hope you see the difference,” Mr. Korsmeyer said, a moment before his words were cut short. “This is what’s happening.”

As Salton Sea faces ecological collapse, a plan to save it with ocean water is rejected by the U.N.’s top scientific body.

And it seems there are not many people fighting the battle to save the Salton Sea from disappearing.

At first glance, the Salton Sea is not a large body of water. It sits in the state of California just north of the state’s border withNevada. It is not a body of water that’s large enough to fit in a small city. And it is not a body of water that is large enough to drown an entire town or even an entire state. At its biggest size, it is about two and a half square miles and is about 12 miles by 8 miles.

But when you really examine it, the Salton Sea is much more than an unassuming body of water. It not only is a home to the endangered California sea lion and the endangered Southern Resident killer whale, it is also a home to a diverse ecosystem of plants and animals. It is a place where tourists flock to see the rare giant sea fan, a plant that grows

Leave a Comment