The Wallis Art Space

How Micaela Taylor turned pandemic stillness into a creative explosion at the Wallis Art Space

An excerpt from Taylor’s new exhibition, C.O.M.O., an allusion to her friend’s novel of the same name, which is about finding home through the comfort of stillness. Photo: Mireya Garcia

A couple of weeks before we moved in, the Wallis Art Space sent a list of the events going on over the course of the exhibition, and I read every single one. And I was so excited to read that this piece of art on the wall of my new studio was for my first show. That I was going to be one of two artists to ever have their work in a first-ever show at the space in Brooklyn, alongside the likes of Susan Rothenberg and Sarah Schulman.

A couple of weeks before we moved in, the Wallis Art Space sent a list of the events going on over the course of the exhibition, and I read every single one. And I was so excited to read that this piece of art on the wall of my new studio was for my first show. That I was going to be one of two artists to ever have their work in a first-ever show at the space in Brooklyn, alongside the likes of Susan Rothenberg and Sarah Schulman.

But when I picked the photo up from my wall earlier this month, I was shocked by how little time had passed since I’d seen the work, and was struck by the eerie stillness of the space. The walls were not painted, but the light fixtures and the small tables on the floor had been painted.

The space is in a former church, which was converted into an arts complex in the late 1980s. It’s been a neighborhood favorite for several decades, and while it’s known now for its restaurants and bars and the proximity to Prospect Park,

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